GREAT FALLS TRIBUNE                                                                    Friday, November 13, 1998

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ARTHUR KEGEL

  MILES CITY - Former Custer County extension agent Arthur Kegel, 86, died Friday in Miles City of natural causes.

Visitation is 1-9 p.m. today at Stevenson & Sons Funeral Home in Miles City.His funeral is 2 p.m. Saturday at First Prespbyterian Church.

  Kegel was born Jan. 12, 1912, in Minnesota, and was raised on a ranch at Turner. He graguated from Montana State University with a Bachelor's of Science and a master's degree in agricultural science.

  Kegel taugh animal science at MSU and was a member of Alpha Zeta Honorary. He left his teaching position to enlist in the U.S.Army during World War II. After his return he became the ag extension agent for Powder River and Custer counties, and was a county agent for Custer County for 30 years.

  Kegel was active in the Miles City community, serving on many civic committees.

  Surviving are his wife, Marjorie; a daughter, Arlene Corbin of Miles City; sisters, EthelCowell of Harlem and Agnes Erickson and Alice Tollefson of Saco; brothers, Kenneth Kegel of Turner, Wes Kegel of Earth, Minn. and Marvin Kegel of North Platte, Neb.; and four grandchildren.

  A daughter,Brenda and a son,Charles, have died.

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BLAINE CO. JOURNAL NEWS-OPINION                                       Wednesday, November 25, 1998

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CLARENCE KEGEL

  Arthur Clarence Kegel died November 12, 1998,  in the Holy Rosary Health Center in Miles City, MT.

  He was born (the oldest of ten children) on January 12, 1912, to Charles and Anna (Houska) Kegel in St. Paul,MN, and was raised on the family homestead in what became known as the Little Jewell Community on the Big Flat. He attended school at Little Jewell and graduated from Turner High School. As a young boy Clarence walked with his brother Fred to Savoy where they worked for the Cronk Ranch, Clarence Watkins and Tom Everett. They put up hay and worked the sugarbeets until the new high school opened in Turner.

  During his college career he and four of his siblings were featured in the New York Times when they entered Northern Montana College at the same time.

Clarence recieved a Bachelor of Science and a Masters Degreee in Agricultural Science and later taught animal science at Montana State College, where he was a member of the Alpha Zeta Honorary Society.

  When W.W. II began he left his position at the university and jpoined the Army.  He served in the Pacific campaign and fought the Japanese. After the war he was hired as the Ag Extension Agent for Powder River and Custer Counties. On October 5, 1948 he married Marjorie Cooper in Bozeman and they recently celebrated their 50th Aniversary in Coeur d'Alene, ID.

  He was the Custer County agent for 30 years until his retirement in 1977. As a young agent he was instumental in contolling the outbreak of brucellosis in Montana. He brought many interesting programs to Custer County for the farmers and ranchers. He also served on the Custer County Selective Service Board (for which he recieved a presidential citation), the Custer County Fair Board, the mosquito control board, and the noxious weed control board.

  Clarence was proud of the achievements of his 4-H member and he served on the 4-H Council of Custer County. He always said "Every 4-H member ia a champion." When he retired he was presented an honorary flag pole at the 4-H building at the faigrounds.

  He was also a member of the First Presbyterian Church, served on the City County planning board, served as president of the State County Agents Congress and was their deligate to the National County Agent Convention (where he was honored as "The Man Of The Year for 1962", was an activemember of Epsilon Singma Phi (an Extension Service honorary society that fosters scholorships for deserving young scholars), was a member of and served on the board of directors of the Range Riders Museum, was a life member of the Elk Club and the VFW, and was involved in the Montana Stockgrowers Association. He served as sheep inspector for the State of Montana and was a designated wool corer. He was also an authority on Montana history and Native American history.

  Survivors include his wife, Marjorie; one daughter, Arlene and her husband J. Dennis Corbin of Miles City; three sisters, Alice Tollefson and Agnes Erickson  both of Saco, and Ethel Cowell of Harlem; three brothers, Kenneth  of Turner, Wesley of Blue Earth, MN and Marvin of North Platte, NE; four grandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews.

  He was preceded in death by a daughter, Brenda Anne; a son, Charles Brent; two brothers, Charles and Frederick; one sister, Marjorie Knapton.

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